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RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #1 
There is a gentleman who owns a hunting lodge and acreage that has a mulcher head that needs balanced. He lives in Goochland, VA. I'm 5-1/2 hours away, and Danny can't do it due to other commitments. Anyone on here who lives closer than I and that has the balancing experience that could help this gentleman out?

If you've never balanced one, they are a rotating drum full of carbide teeth mounted on stands, that chew up vegetation. They spin in the 2500-3000 RPM category and require fairly heavy weight that is welded on.

If anyone is interested let me know.

D
Alex

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Reply with quote  #2 
I've done a lot of mulcher balancing but I don't come from that region. The reason I write in this theme is I would like to get your opinion what is the suitable price for such a job. As here in Europe mulcher owners always find the price (too) high.  
John from PA

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex
I've done a lot of mulcher balancing but I don't come from that region. The reason I write in this theme is I would like to get your opinion what is the suitable price for such a job. As here in Europe mulcher owners always find the price (too) high.  


The engineer retired and a few weeks later a very critical machine broke down, which was essential to the company’s revenue.  The Manager couldn’t get the machine to work again so the company called in the retired engineer as an independent consultant.

The engineer agreed to work as a consultant.  He walks into the factory, takes a look at the machine, goes out and buys a hammer and on his return whacks the machine once whereupon the machine starts right up. He then leaves and the company is making money again.

The next day the plant manager receives a bill from the retired engineer for $5,000. The manager is furious at the price and refuses to pay. The engineer assures him that it’s a fair price and offers to submit an itemized bill.

The new, itemized bill reads….

Hammer:  $5

Knowing where to hit the machine with hammer: $4995

RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #4 
I just charge a regular 4 hours or 8 hours. In this instance I’m sure the gentleman is going to find my quote high. 5-1/2 hours one way (320 miles) is a lot of travel expenses. Then do you charge anything other than a day? Perhaps. I quoted a day + expenses. I’d probably only charge 4 hours if things went well but one never knows.
Alex

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Reply with quote  #5 
John, that's just how it is in reality [smile]
OLi

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Reply with quote  #6 

I met a purchaser chief at a papermill once in the corridor after a job going home and he said "You are a hell of a guy to charge, I get a welder fully equipped for half your price". Once in a lifetime I found the words and said "Now your machine run 100 m/min faster (9 m wide, w/o problems) than when I came, give me 0.001 of your net income of that increase the first year and I call it good". It was a news machine and every flake produced at that time was sold.
He said no more.

We did the same work on a identical machine at another plant but they never applied the improvement but paid the work w/o arguing, sites are seriously different.

We have the same story here as the above with the payment breakdown about a church painter touching up virgin Mary's boobs in a church where the split is like brush and paint 10 c and the rest is for know how. So it apply on many specialties but getting paid for know how may be interesting sometimes.


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RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #7 
When I worked for IRD we used to quote companies two ways. One was standard rate, expenses, etc. and the other if they balked on that, was to quote them 1% of documented savings. We would let them pick who would be their document-er, and use their agreed upon numbers for downtime costs, etc. Never had one bite after they started figuring in downtime costs and what an hour here and four hours there would be worth. Quote number 1 looked mighty good then.

D
Vibe-Rater

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Reply with quote  #8 
Oli, I work in same industry and luckily I have clients who do not question invoice. As we say here in Australia - "I do not take the piss". Meaning I do not take advantage.

Recently had word on rates from other service provider (negligible pulp and paper experience) and comments from client were - their hourly rates are too high. So I though I am good with what I charge. They were 15% higher than me. Not a lot but then there is that trigger point. They do give me quite a bit of work and are a long time client (26 years) so my pricing reflects that compared with new clients.

I was employed in BVI (British Virgin Islands for those not in the know) Tortola to remove a bare breasted figure head from the yacht I worked on at the time and we sold her for US$1600. (owner was running out of money) We even found the original photos the figurehead was constructed from. But that is another story. Not vibration related.

You started it Oli.  rgds
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #9 
My hourly rates are the same for everyone, but beyond that a lot of it (travel, overtime, etc) depends on the circumstances.  I will charge a small local manufacturer less, because they have less available, and I don't want them to "do without" help they need because they think it's too expensive.  On the other hand, calling me out on a Saturday because my cheaper competitor has been to the plant twice in as many days - and not solved the problem - well, that's going to cost them dearly, enough that they'll think twice before doing it again.  When a mid-level manager has me drive 4 hours to "witness" an aligment process by another contractor, that will be at a premium price even though I didn't do that much, because it would be bad business to not charge what I'm worth to their organization in this instance.
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RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #10 
I agree. My cut off for travel is 2 hours one way. If it’s 2 hours or less, I don’t charge travel expenses. I also try to charge small business less than big corporations, simply because they most generally can’t pay a bigger price without it hurting them. Big business though, wastes more in an hour than I’ll ever charge. Some of them are ridiculously wasteful.
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