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RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #16 
I run thin-kerf blades on my Dewalt job site saw and it cuts like butter. With a thin kerf rip blade I’ve ripped oak with the blade (10”) all the way up and didn’t even bog the saw down. Mine is an older model with an inch and a metric rip scale. One of my favorite tools ever.
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OLi

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Reply with quote  #17 
Ah I mostly worked with wood cutting things that is abundant around here. A few hundred saw mills 95% w/o any fancy word maintenance. I have sold like 5 vibrometers and 2 analyzers to that industry, not that I haven't tried. They even stop the mill to drink coffee as it is so noisy otherwise.... With metal cutting I only put a sensor on a brass stock cutter that chopped the cast ingots from the continuous casting. It just did show the vibration level in the panel for the operator so he could adjust the cutting speed for lowest vibration and that did give it a longer lifetime. We could not figure out any other way to do anything as they run it down frequently before. If they reworked those blades I don't know but it would not surprise me. Same place only cleaned the front of the fan that you could see when we were going to balance it, on the backside it was full with zinc deposit. When it was cleaned it was also magically balanced.....
I was also called to a machine at the same site where there were loose bolts and I could reuse the report from 5-7 years earlier where I suggested bolting down the remaining bolts and replacing the missing bolts that were still missing that many years later. I am happy I found the same problem twice anyway. Some sites and happenings make a special place in the memory.

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RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #18 
Rpm n=900rpm
Degree of balancing G=6.3mm/s
Allowable residual balance et=66.8mm

After looking over Balance Quality, my conclusion is the numbers used are OK, but wording/units are wrong. Properly written it would be:

Service Speed: 900 rpm
Required Balance Quality: G6.3

And that’s really all that’s needed.

The last term they used is unnecessary and confusing unless the units are stated correctly, but if included should be stated as:

Allowable CG Displacement: 66.8 um
or
Permissible Specific Unbalance: 66.8 um-kg/kg or better yet, 66.8 g-mm/kg

As is often the case, this spec was written (poorly) so as to fit in the block on the print. The 66.8 mm was either a lack of understanding or a lack of proofreading - inexcusable either way on a production drawing.

Thanks for your input and discussion!

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