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spciesla

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Reply with quote  #31 
That's a good one Rusty, is it 20% of the people or 20% of the comments? [biggrin]
OLi

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Reply with quote  #32 
Both?...... sometimes?[rolleyes]
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Noknroll

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Reply with quote  #33 
Quote:
By contrast, only 20% of what’s posted here is BS. ;-) 


But 80% of it is believable
OLi

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Reply with quote  #34 
Yes, I am gullible.
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Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #35 
Pete,

It was a slip and fall from a habitually overgreased bearing on an overhead lineshaft. Two broken or injured wrists in a classic Charlie Chaplin slip and sit. The condition still exists.

I prevented one by grabbing an overzealous Maintenance Supervisor by the belt as he leaned over a failing bearing that had been overgreased as a solution to failed seals. Despite my warnings, he was standing in a puddle of grease, paper stock and water, leaning not quite over but towards the coupling, so as a precaution, I got friendly with him and grabbed him by the belt just before he lost his footing.  I forgot to add the outcome.  I had warned him that sometimes adding grease to a really bad bearing (this one was really, really rusty) seems to bring on the end. This one did just that.  We hadn't even gathered ourselves up from the knee-deep muck before we heard the airplane coming in for a landing and the ugly noise of a bearing lockup on a 200 hp 6 pole motor.

There are some things that are worth dying for but to squeeze a few more hours out of a motor is not one of them, imo. And yes, I had made the call months before.

I guess to be honest, these were due to poor housekeeping but it illustrates the dangers of flooding your bearings with grease when you should be replacing the seals. The lube guy is quite often the lowest man on the totem pole and neither knowledgeable enough to know how bad a practice this is; given the authority to change it; nor equipped to clean up after it.

But it happens all the time.
OLi

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Reply with quote  #36 
[thumb][rofl]
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electricpete

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Reply with quote  #37 
nnThanks Danny. I can see how that could be a problem.  We've had a few oil leaks where oil got on the floor and then tracked around on walkways and ladders in the vicinity of the machine.

It reminds me - the closest I ever came to having a fall was not related to oil but it was on a ladder.  I was getting onto a permanent vertical ladder between levels to climb down some 25’ or so.  I had on the safety glasses with the small "cheater" magnifying windows on the bottom. When I glanced downward to see the first step I was looking through those cheater windows, but didn’t realize it (I think everything looked a little fuzzy anyway due to the condensation or sweat on my glasses) so I misjudged the distance and stepped where there was no rung.   The next thing I know I am clinging for dear life [eek] onto the swinging guard rail (the one which swings closed to prevent stepping into the hole in the floor by the ladder entrance). I can't remember all the details, but I know it was scary.   I don’t think I would have survived a 25’ fall onto the concrete floor.   

Needless to say  ... no more cheater safety glasses for me.  They're an accident waiting to happen as far as I'm concerned. 

Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #38 
When they first came out with those, there was a similar accident at one of my clients.  A worker didn't see a step because it was in the line between the reader portion and the clear plastic portion. Broken leg.

I still use them but my guys know that if they are following me on steps, there will be a slight pause at the first step on each flight.

The swinging guard rails are a worse hazard, imo. They occupy your hands at the point when you need them the most.
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #39 
Some older installations still have chains with snap hooks, and they want you to (hold on with one hand while you) snap the chain in place at the platform when you start to climb the ladder down. I guess that’s so when you climb back up you get to hold on with one hand while you try and unsnap the chain. Go figure.
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tomcd3

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Reply with quote  #40 
Still just one failure due to over or under lubrication is a good argument for automatic lubrication.
OLi

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Reply with quote  #41 
Indeed, just keep those auto buggers greased then...... and at a lo enough feed rate normally and so they don't hang, get stuck... normally works fine these days part from filling, swapping that is a human trouble..... 
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Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #42 
"Some older installations still have chains with snap hooks, and they want you to (hold on with one hand while you) snap the chain in place at the platform when you start to climb the ladder down. I guess that’s so when you climb back up you get to hold on with one hand while you try and unsnap the chain. Go figure."

They are really designed for the exact opposite use. You are supposed to close it as you enter the platform and leave it open as you exit unless there are others on the platform.  

In practice, it's almost always done like you say, though.
 
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