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ensayospredictivos

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Reply with quote  #1 
81cQnB6s4-L._SL1500_.jpg  double-shaft-motors-133.jpg 

Hello friends!
In the next day I will analyze a systems that is composed of an induction motor of 60 hp and 1750 rpm. The motor has two DE (drive end) where two oil-hydraulic vane pumps are coupled on both sides.
It's the first time I get this kind of arrangement.
What should I expect in the spectra?
Does anyone have experience in this type of arrangement?
Is it advisable to make measurements at 100% load or 0% load?
As always, thanks for your good comments!
Sincerely,



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Noknroll

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Reply with quote  #2 
Expect to get dominant vane/piston pass frequency across your motor as well. Not sure what system you use, If CSi you will likely have to use the "peak remove" function to see if any bearing faults are underlying the pump frequencies, effective, but slows down the analysis process
Sinski

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Pretty much what Nok says. I have come across this arrangement at the old paper mill I used to work at. From memory the data look just like it would from a single vane pump arrangement. Never saw any faults on these while I was there so never were replaced.
Walt Strong

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"Is it advisable to make measurements at 100% load or 0% load?"

I have not worked on a double pump arrangement, but several single pumps. I recommend both operating load conditions, if possible. At no load the pump pulsations have minimal amplitude, and there should be no pump cavitation, so motor and pump bearing faults (or lube issues), and possibly pump mechanical wear could be detected. Shaft misalignment and coupling condition (I prefer ultrasound) can also be easier to detect. When pumps are at/near full load, then changes in pulsation characteristics (waveform and spectrum) can be detected along with cavitation.

Walt
Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #5 
We cover some big Husky injection molders that have usually one pump on one end and two on the other.  I normally collect data as they are loaded by feeling the hoses.

There is usually something like 7-11 teeth on the impeller and removing those harmonics will allow vibration analysis on the bearings.
ensayospredictivos

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Reply with quote  #6 

Thank you all for sharing your experiences.
Regards,


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