Sign up Calendar Latest Topics Donate
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 2      Prev   1   2
Walt Strong

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 889
Reply with quote  #16 
As a safety check, ask yourself where will the pole go if you or your assistant lose control of it. A vertical pole lift is a lot easier than a reaching at an angle. I used Velcro cable ties to keep cable close to pole, and they are easy to remove and reuse.

Walt
David Eason

Member
Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #17 
Vibe-Rater asked what others use in paper, I had a Mr. Longarm Smart-Lok 3-5 feet (1-1.6m) that I used on a daily basis and a Mr. Longarm Smart-Lok 7-13 feet (2-4 m) that I used when the short one wouldn't make it. I used the 6-inch angle adapter on them and used electrician's tape to hold the accel cable. I liked the CTC AC-116 right-angle accel with a 50# magnet. The tape would wear out every 2-3 years and I would have to replace it.

David 
MarkL

Avatar / Picture

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,121
Reply with quote  #18 
David, I use a similar accelerometer (Mines a Wilcoxon though) and have the unit taped to the head on the end of the pole, its a shorter unit got it in a DIY store, was originally designed for a telescopic mop. Works a treat and is short enough retracted to use on low to the ground motors and gearboxes.
David Eason

Member
Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #19 
MarkL,
I guess you're talking about the Wilcoxon 797, it's good.

Danny,
I often extended my long pole to it's full length even when I didn't need that much reach. The extra weight in the back made a good counterweight, and it gave me better control. You might consider a counterweight if space allows.

David
RustyCas

Avatar / Picture

Admin
Registered:
Posts: 1,810
Reply with quote  #20 
I don’t run into this much, but some of you will recall I made my own adjustable head that screws onto any paint pole (Wooster Sherlock is the best, imo).

Why not use a ladder and a short pole? I have am 8 ft fiberglass stepladder I carry in my truck, but after several years I decided it was just too heavy (maybe I just got older?). So now I use a Flip N Lite aluminum step ladder with a standing platform. Made by Little Giant, it’s a 300 lb ladder and well made. It’s very lightweight and the standing platform on the 6 ft model is at 45” so you avoid the 48” safety harness requirement. And fiberglass is only required when working on electrical equipment, so plant safety requirements should be satisfied.

Standing at 4 ft plus a typical 6 ft reach, your going to be at 10 ft, so only need a short pole. Easier to maneuver, better attachment of your accel, better angles.

https://www.amazon.com/Flip-N-Lite-300-Pound-Rating-Stepladder-Platform/dp/B0043WP52O/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1536494697&sr=8-2&keywords=Flip+n+lite&dpID=41GbPItqx1L&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch




__________________
"The trend is your friend"
Danny Harvey

Sr. Member / Moderator / Supporter
Registered:
Posts: 1,402
Reply with quote  #21 
Rusty,

I don't think I work in a single plant that will allow aluminum ladders.  At one site I would be fined $500 just for having it with me and up to $5000 for using it.

This is a pretty backwoods place but they have a safety officer who does regular walk-arounds and I suspect that I will need to work with him to either come up with a safe way to do it or not do it at all. They might consider putting accels but I get the feeling that the money isn't really going to flow without a tax incentive.  (I did mention that this is West Virginia, I think.)

Plus, at 4' even with a 10' pole I'm a foot short if I stand directly under the shaft.  So we're talking about standing at max height on an 8' fiberglass ladder on an uneven floor with at pole that is at least 10' long.

I'm afraid that's just not going to have much curb appeal to the safety officer or to the guys who have to collect the data.

Thanks again to all for the helpful suggestions.  We will see what we can work out with our client. 
RustyCas

Avatar / Picture

Admin
Registered:
Posts: 1,810
Reply with quote  #22 
Danny, I don't understand the math here, or maybe we use poles differently.  I use my largest magnet (150 lb pull) and I don't have to rest the pole on the ground.  Once it's attached I just have to hold the pole very lightly with one hand, and hit the enter key with the other.  So for a 15' reach, if I'm standing with my feet at 4 ft, my hand is going to be 5 ft higher, so 9 ft.  I only need a 6-8 ft pole.

And "no aluminum ladders" is typical safety department hysteria, not OSHA compliance.  I'm pretty sure "exposed energized electrical equipment" is not permitted anywhere.  I suppose I might get dinged on this someday, but I'm about ready to be done with all this anyway, so not too worried.
 
1926.1053(b)(12)
Ladders shall have nonconductive siderails if they are used where the employee or the ladder could contact exposed energized electrical equipment, except as provided in §1926.955(b) and (c) of this part.

__________________
"The trend is your friend"
Danny Harvey

Sr. Member / Moderator / Supporter
Registered:
Posts: 1,402
Reply with quote  #23 
Rusty,

Now that you mention it I think I left myself out of the math. I hope to leave myself out of the data collection also, so I guess I showed my true intentions.

If all we had to do was satisfy OSHA regulations, life would be easy.

But instead we have to go so far beyond what is necessary to keep us safe that it becomes obvious that the concern is not our safety, it's protection our clients seek from litigation.

And we're no safer because of it.
Sinski

Avatar / Picture

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 394
Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vibe-Rater
Sinsk, your basement is about the only one where my 3 section pole is not quite long enough and need to bring in your one.  But you are installing permanents there yeah? rgds.


Yes they are installed and just as that happened we had a fire and burned some of them out. When thats all done there will be no need to go under the machine.
Danny Harvey

Sr. Member / Moderator / Supporter
Registered:
Posts: 1,402
Reply with quote  #25 
'When thats all done there will be no need to go under the machine."

But you'll just go down there for fun, right?[wink]
Vibe-Rater

Avatar / Picture

Sr. Member / Moderator / Supporter
Registered:
Posts: 1,397
Reply with quote  #26 
Danny, I have been under Sinsk's machine a lot of times, only second to Sinsk after all these years. And the hot oil dripping, and slippery sloping concrete floor and the wet gluggy pulpy paper, of course it is fun.... NOT. And is why I am happy to hear that permanents are installed. Oh well. It is work and sort of fun... when the data collection stops.  Mind over matter, if you don't mind it does not matter.  Seriously you have to have a special mind set for paper machines.  Such enormous jobs you just have to start and keep going, if you do that you will eventually complete the job only to do it all over again next month. rgds
Sinski

Avatar / Picture

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 394
Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danny Harvey
'When thats all done there will be no need to go under the machine."

But you'll just go down there for fun, right?[wink]


For safety reasons we are not allowed to go directly under the rolls or the rope pulleys. We can still go inside the hood as long as not under the rolls which that area is chained off so can still go there and do visual inspections etc.?
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.