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spciesla

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Reply with quote  #16 
I took (and passed) the Mobius Cat IV exam in October 2016 in the USA (Houston, TX).  I had the choice of choosing the units English or SI when I signed up for the class and exam.
VibGuy~5

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Reply with quote  #17 
From memory, I think Cat IV was offered as a choice of English or metric units (but my memory is not what is used to be!!)
Vibe-Rater

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Reply with quote  #18 
I can only remember SI units but sat the Mobius ISO4 here in Melbourne Australia which came to its senses back in late 60's by moving from imperial to metric.  I grew up SI units, it just all makes so much sense, then moved to Australia at age 12, learnt imperial cause somehow that existed, and really, a system based on hands, thumbs and feet.  The Dutch word for inch is thumb (duim) I reckon there might be other European languages where this reference is relevant.  Carpenters nails are still referred to in their inch sizes (twee duimers, 3 duimers) Oli...? Anyway... mmmmmm. rgds  btw I passed tooo! Back in November 2014 I think it was. Scraped over the line because of totally underestimating the pre course material that had to be worked through - beforehand. But hey, I'll take the pass.

JasonTranter

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Reply with quote  #19 
We do offer the formula sheet openly, but it is an oversight that it is not on our Website - I will see that that is fixed. All of the people who register for the course receive the formula sheet along with a very detailed "worked examples" booklet so they can test their knowledge on "exam grade" questions. We also provide the answer to all questions with a fairly detailed explanation.
spciesla

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vibe-Rater
I can only remember SI units but sat the Mobius ISO4 here in Melbourne Australia which came to its senses back in late 60's by moving from imperial to metric.  I grew up SI units, it just all makes so much sense, then moved to Australia at age 12, learnt imperial cause somehow that existed, and really, a system based on hands, thumbs and feet.  The Dutch word for inch is thumb (duim) I reckon there might be other European languages where this reference is relevant.  Carpenters nails are still referred to in their inch sizes (twee duimers, 3 duimers) Oli...? Anyway... mmmmmm. rgds  btw I passed tooo! Back in November 2014 I think it was. Scraped over the line because of totally underestimating the pre course material that had to be worked through - beforehand. But hey, I'll take the pass.



I understand the logic behind the metric system and can use both imperial and metric units in calculations.  But it's not like the meter isn't arbitrary.  The one thing that drives me nuts is using kg for weight (instead of mass) and pressure in units of kgf / cm^2 or whatever.  What in the world is a kgf?  Metric gave you Newtons, use them.  

Rant over!
Vibe-Rater

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Reply with quote  #21 
Hi spciesla, when I learnt imperial I really found it difficult with all the fractions like 3/64" etc and 12 inches per foot and all the other numbers.  I still have to think really hard. Found the metric system based on 10's a lot easier.  But as engineer and so many machines coming from either England or US it is still necessary to be able to work with imperial.  And timber / lumber sizes are still fundamentally imperial they just call a 4" x 2" a 100mm x 50mm now.  So an example where imperial might be easier to use. 

Hopefully interestingly, when I learnt the metric system it included the decimeter and hectometer in the teachings.  Coming to Australia no one had heard of those. 1 cubic decimeter is a liter and a liter of water is a kilogram (at certain temperature).  On the major roads in the Netherlands you have "hecto paaltjes".  Small posts on the side of the major roads at intervals of a hectometer (100  meters) This helps identify your exact location if that is required in say, the case of an accident. 

Anyway, everyone can add that detail to their little book of useless information. rgds
John from PA

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vibe-Rater
When I learnt imperial I really found it difficult with all the fractions like 3/64" etc and 12 inches per foot and all the other numbers.  I still have to think really hard.


Vibe-Rater, had you entered the technical field in the era of the slide rule it would have all been simple.  [rolleyes] sr.jpg

Vibe-Rater

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Reply with quote  #23 
Hi John from PA, I DO actually have a slide rule that I inherited from my father.  But I never learnt to use it.  My first calculator was a Sharp elsiemate or something like it. I just looked for it thinking I still had it but could not find.  Was one of those pre LCD with the bright green digit segments if that makes sense.  Close - but not quite this one - http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Vintage-Calculator-Sharp-Elsi-Mate-EL-8117K-/263009141702?hash=item3d3c9103c6:g:WCUAAOSw44BYFC6M The sliderule is a Faber Castell No. 57 / 89.  Instructions in Dutch.  which i can read but never made the time to learn about. You know, I didn't bother with a Penny Farthing because I have a perfectly good car to get around in.
Noknroll

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Reply with quote  #24 
I still have my first scientific calculator with green segmented numbers, made by general electric. I got it in 1980 and still works
Vibe-Rater

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Reply with quote  #25 
Your showing your age now Nok, you must be at least 30.
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