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Shurafa2

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Reply with quote  #1 
I just wonder, based on what you see, if quick connect (disconnect) devices are common in your world. I'm referring to mounting devices that are permanently installed on machines in order to collect vibration by portable accelerometers. They are supposed to provide faster and more reliable data compared to other mounting methods like two-pole magnets.

I never used them, never saw them in real use but my world is small. I ask this question because I noticed that there is an emphasis on their value in some training materials and I'm not sure if my exposure is realy far from an average facility.

They were mentioned in this and the other forum a couple of times but again are they really popular to be a part of vibration training.

For those who are interested in more details on these adaptors, below is a link (I'm not affiliated to them).

https://www.ctconline.com/accelerometer_quick_disconnect.aspx

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa
OLi

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Reply with quote  #2 
I sold 1 bag of them on specific request in all these years. I only saw versions of them as traces from DLI user efforts at customer sites IRL. So we did make adaptors to use them when found to be put in suitable places.
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MarkL

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Reply with quote  #3 
We used to push them but people weren't sold on them.
I have has just as good repeatability and uptake from customers with flat 1/2'inch galvanized washers attached with adhesive and a taking readings with a flat magnet. galvwasher.jpg 

Noknroll

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Reply with quote  #4 
No I haven't seen them, but they look like a good idea if using a triax which I dont
OLi

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Reply with quote  #5 
Washers we do use and suggest specific on modern stuff that is aluminium.
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Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #6 
I've always hated aluminum motors because with a ferrous surface, I can mount the accel and have both hands free to clean the surfaces on the fan or pump while I collect the low fmax reading on the demb.

But now it might not be so bad because it might keep me from touching my face.
Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #7 
I have encountered many, many more flat washers epoxied on than I have quick disconnects.
MarkL

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danny Harvey
I've always hated aluminum motors because with a ferrous surface, I can mount the accel and have both hands free to clean the surfaces on the fan or pump while I collect the low fmax reading on the demb.

But now it might not be so bad because it might keep me from touching my face.


Demb? Not familiar with that term Danny.
Also low fmax reading? Do you not collect all from one point? Velocity acceleration demos/peakvue ? Just curious in what you described.

Noknroll

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Reply with quote  #9 
Shurafa
Just checking
when you say quick connects, are you referring to the 1/4 turn on/off type with notch for orienting triax accel? 
a lot of responses seem to be referring to flat disc targets for ordinary portable magnet mount accels
Shurafa2

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noknroll
Shurafa
Just checking
when you say quick connects, are you referring to the 1/4 turn on/off type with notch for orienting triax accel? 
a lot of responses seem to be referring to flat disc targets for ordinary portable magnet mount accels


Yes, indeed, I'm referring to 1/4 turn or other similar means. It seems this is not commonly used and the members are suggesting alternatives that are probably more common and less expensive.

The "target pads" are different from "quick connects" but they are fast and more reliable than other methods, as most of us recognize, I guess.

Do you have different thoughts?

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa
MarkL

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Reply with quote  #11 
These are the ones we normally sell.(arrow)

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Curran919

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Reply with quote  #12 

I saw these once in an automotive plant.

My predecessors used to use these as well on trains, which I guess insulation is often necessary?

Otherwise, its always been washers and epoxy.

trapper

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Reply with quote  #13 
In one of my old employers, we had a gearbox-pump that provided high pressure water (IIRC, couple thousand pounds) to the control rod drive system (nuclear plant). The output speed was 6,772 RPM and the first gear mesh frequency was around 225,000 CPM (3750 Hz). When we first instituted the program, data was all over the place. When CTC started producing these, I recommended them for that gearbox. Once we installed them, we had consistent readings on that gearbox and I was willing to trust the data if we had a problem. After over 8 years of use, they were still no problems with getting them on and off if you use the caps and can stop the maintenance crew from getting paint all over them.

When I got to this plant, the data collection techniques were a little haphazard by my predecessors and data was all over the place on the gearboxes. It didn't help that the plant did not want us gluing things such as washers to their machines. I tried convincing them that these would provide much more consistent data no matter who was taking the data but they balked at spending a couple hundred dollars per gearbox that all were well over the 6-figure replacement cost should something catastrophic happen. I don't understand the logic.

They're a little expensive but if you have an application for them such as very high frequencies or very high replacement cost and you're worried about getting good data, then they should be a good investment. I wouldn't bother on lower cost components and stick to the washers instead.
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