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dnk

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Reply with quote  #16 
In 1991 I was given a IRD 890 and a software program and told start a vibration program. After a year I talked the boss into having a outside expert come in and show me what I was doing wrong. He helped me overhaul my database and helped me with basic analysis. We got a new maintenance manager who was very interested in PDM. He allowed me to receive training in vibration analysis, ultrasound, balancing and thermogragy. It took between 2-3 years until I became confident with my analysis skills. Took even longer to convince co-workers this wasn't voodoo. Eventually I helped start programs at our sister plants.
How long it takes depends on how much support you get from management.
Vibe-Rater

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Reply with quote  #17 
.  I was lucky to be taught by a brlliant person. Variable speed paper machines. And I would like to think that some of my brothers in arms are similarly equiped.  All too often the large companys don''t like training.  Tooo costly. They just employ cat 1 2 3 and hope for the best.  Then the dedicated small companies come along and do all the hard yards. And then the superdudes leave for the big smoke. mm  Just me complaining I guess. 
JuddJones

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Reply with quote  #18 
I think the most important aspect to learning quickly in our field (and it has been touched on in this thread) is mechanical aptitude. If a person does not have the ability to visualize in their head the machine movements, and the effects of defects, they will have a difficult time excelling in  Vibration Analysis. I have been doing vibe 40 hours a week for 4 years now. We had a contractor come in and help us get a database setup and provide some very basic training 3 times in the first year. We had the Mobius ILearn vibration software (I highly recommend this for anyone starting out. It has level 1-3 self paced learning with videos and simulators) that I used approximately 20 hours a week the first year. Attended Level 2 training at about 8 months into the program, and certified Level 3 after about a year and a half in the field. It took about another year after that before I started feeling confident in my skills to make a call on critical equipment. I think the right person, with an in house mentor (who is skilled in VA) could become proficient in a years time if they had some type of applicable skillset prior (engineer, millwright, electrician). If they are building a program internally with outside training, and limited access to a mentor, I think that number jumps to 3-5 years. The 3-5 years also assumes they have the proper support and expectations from management, AND the person has the necessary skills and drive to build a program WHILE learning the skills needed to be proficient.
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #19 
The unrealistic ideas that "management" has about what it takes to have a proficient program, is this driven by the claims of the equipment vendors? Essentially, "Our instrument is so powerful and easy to use that even a caveman can do it!"
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JuddJones

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyCas
The unrealistic ideas that "management" has about what it takes to have a proficient program, is this driven by the claims of the equipment vendors? Essentially, "Our instrument is so powerful and easy to use that even a caveman can do it!"

I think that is an issue in our industry, but I was speaking more to management thinking that they will achieve results in the first year upon purchasing VA equipment. Also management can be unrealistic in thinking that failed bearings are a thing of the past, or that an analyst will not make a call that is premature or wrong. I was fortunate to have mangers who did not treat it as a negative if I made a bad call, or missed something. Their answer was always "as long as we learn from it, it wasn't a mistake".
VibGuy~5

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Reply with quote  #21 
Some wise words-thank you.
Regarding age-nothing wrong with being young, or old, or in the middle. As long as our brains are fresh and gets worked out every day -just like exercise.
I like to be beside machines and visualise what could go wrong. I find the further away from machines the engineers get, the more flowery the language becomes in telling us how to make it more reliable

Big Al

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Reply with quote  #22 
The original post states that the programme will be run by trained up fitters and electricians. For me you're already halfway there. These guys have spent several years in an apprenticeship learning maintenance practices and how machines are assembled. Probably with further years implementing this knowledge. This will go a long way to making realistic vibration based calls.

After that, I'd say having a strong mentor and certified training should create a useful analyst within a year or two (aiming for a minimum of VA2). Proficiency will come with time and the more you learn, the more you realise what you still don't know. Fortunately there are abundant online resources today that simply weren't available when I started out. If this can all be integrated with the other technologies (IR, Ultrasound, Oil Analysis, etc) and relationships are maintained with trainers, service providers, suppliers and peers then you're on the right road.

A real biggy for me is that you need someone who is genuinely interested in this field. It simply isn't for everyone.
Sinski

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Al
The original post states that the programme will be run by trained up fitters and electricians. For me you're already halfway there. These guys have spent several years in an apprenticeship learning maintenance practices and how machines are assembled. Probably with further years implementing this knowledge. This will go a long way to making realistic vibration based calls.

After that, I'd say having a strong mentor and certified training should create a useful analyst within a year or two (aiming for a minimum of VA2). Proficiency will come with time and the more you learn, the more you realise what you still don't know. Fortunately there are abundant online resources today that simply weren't available when I started out. If this can all be integrated with the other technologies (IR, Ultrasound, Oil Analysis, etc) and relationships are maintained with trainers, service providers, suppliers and peers then you're on the right road.

A real biggy for me is that you need someone who is genuinely interested in this field. It simply isn't for everyone.

That first and last sentence are heavily linked. The interest has to be there or a fitter and electrician will be no better than anyone else. I have seen it alot where they do not care what they are doing with their vibration work and I have had to re-do alot of what they have done. I think your last sentence is the most important. 
JuddJones

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinski

That first and last sentence are heavily linked. The interest has to be there or a fitter and electrician will be no better than anyone else. I have seen it alot where they do not care what they are doing with their vibration work and I have had to re-do alot of what they have done. I think your last sentence is the most important. 


I couldn't agree more. I try to stress this when speaking with managers about creating a program. I think finding the right person is 85% of the battle if there is not a senior vibration guy within the company already.
Noknroll

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Reply with quote  #25 
+ 1 on what Big Al & Sinski said
I still look forward to seeing what the data has to reveal, and often surprise myself when it comes to offering a solution
Doesn't mean I'm any good....just say'n.....its to do with the enthusiasm thing.
OLi

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Reply with quote  #26 
And what do you do when the right person retire and the program crumbles? I have seen several cases of this and it does upset me when so much work is wasted.
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JuddJones

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Reply with quote  #27 
That is a great point. One of our facilities had an analyst pass away many years ago. Their instruments are collecting dust in a closet.
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