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MarkL

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Reply with quote  #61 
Rusty we have sold a lot of them, personally, haven't used one though. Anyone who's used it swears by it. 
Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #62 
I've seen a lot of guys who should have had them.
RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #63 
Seems I remember that I recommended one of those (SKF hyd. wrench) to a company once who bought one. I was under the impression that you could use it in situ, but found out that you had to remove the fan and shaft from housing if I remember correct (Couldn't use it with bearing housing present).
When you've got a 10k# fan sitting on top of a building 6 floors up and need a crane to dissemble the thing, only to use the hyd wrench, and then reassemble it, you'll find a set of feeler gauges, a brass punch and hammer works well on a lubed up sleeve (After you've had a new hub machined and cut the old one off of course). I've had fairly good luck with them, although it does take some patience. I also count threads and have in mind just about how far I'm going to pound the rascal before I get to where I need to be, and I do keep turning it to keep the race square.

Of course today, I'd recommend they get a Cooper or Timken split bearing and forgo the hassle of hub removal/installation etc.

fburgos

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Reply with quote  #64 
I notice people confuse the reduction with the final clearance
RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #65 
I have seen that also. The chart that comes with them specifically says reduction, and to measure on a table first, but I know some that didn't. But they do now[biggrin]
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #66 
“Back in the day” they used to specify the final clearance. Reduction is the way to go, but if they’ve already mounted the bearing that’s not as easy. Usually, you know about what the final clearance should be. Having the final clearance “too tight” is hard to do - I usually have to bang on them more than I’d like to get the recommended reduction. I don’t worry about the clearance being a little “loose” as much as I worry about the sleeve being loose on the shaft. Don’t get the sleeve tight enough, and that bearing is going to disassemble itself.

But get it too tight, and you may find the sleeve split when you take it out of service because it’s showing “looseness” (and no, I didn’t set that one).

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RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #67 
Too tight is hard to get grease into also. Will run hot, but will still run a while.
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #68 
Smaller bearings are fairly easy to get too tight, larger bearings less so. I haven’t done a small bearing in years though.
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Dan Timberlake

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Reply with quote  #69 
If the bearing bore is less than 1.5" or so a naked 100 watt incandescent light bulb makes a decent heater.  I probably saw that in some old Chevy or Mopar factory shop manual back in the last millenium, and have used it with good results several times.

Finding a 100 watt incandescent bulb night be a little challenging these days.

Dan T  
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