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Danny Harvey

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I have a client who runs the same version of SKF @ptitude who wants me to do some database work but I'm not certain how to go about getting the data.

He maintains about 15 plants in a single database on a single user copy.  I would like to be able to separate them into individual databases so that we can work on them one at a time. But I am unsure of how to go about doing that, transferring the data to my network copy, making the needed changes and then restoring it to his computer.


Ralph Stewart

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Reply with quote  #2 
Danny,

Since you have the same version of software as does the client, is there not an extraction program in the software, sort of like CSI software has?

With one being a network version and one being a standalone version, it doesn't seem like it should have much of a bearing on doing what you want to do. Of course, I have never used the SKF software, and it may not allow such things, but seems like it should just be a simple, straight forward task.

Maybe someone who uses SKF can chime in on the way to do it. [smile]

Ralph

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Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #3 
Ralph,

I was thinking about you when I wrote this because you have requested it so many times and it's so easy to do with CSI.

It might be with SKF too but I haven't been able to figure it out yet.
Ralph Stewart

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Have you tried the Manual Archive information on page 2-65 and 66 in the manual?

Might make a little sense to you, but I have never seen the SKF Software, so it is a little bit strange to me, as a non-user.

http://www.skf.com/binary/21-267791/AI_2013_322679b0_UM-EN.pdf


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MarkL

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Reply with quote  #5 
Danny
I can show you but it would be a long winded effort on an email. Drop me a PM maybe we can do something on can create multiple databases on the software. Export the mab file for each data base one by one to avoid possible corruption issues and then import into aptitude, it's a slow process depending on how much data is in the databases of course.

Have you spoken to TSG in Sandiego? said I know SA Diego is pretty much a skeleton crew now a days.

Failing that like I said drop me a PM and let me know a possible time we might be able to chat via Skype, I am on GMT so it's 9:15am here as I type this, and your maybe 5-6 hours behind me?

Ralph that's the manual for the ODR software but pretty much it's the same basis.
Unsure if there's anything in it on data bases, I've never read any manuals all I learned was from the level3 guy from Skf that supports me the last 6--7 years.
Edwin

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Reply with quote  #6 
You can use the menu option [File] - [Export] - [Analyst Data (MAB)] to save (part of) your database. Then import this file on another location.
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Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks for the suggestions.  We will try things out and let you know how it works out.

Thanks again.
Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #8 
I finally got a  chance to test this out and the export/import method works perfectly for copying within the same set of hierarchies. 

You can select what to include and you had better take a look at the selections when you do it.  My test copied the entire bearing database along with the data.

Tow other things to remember:

1. The .mab file that it exports is limited to 2 gigabytes so larger databases need to be broken up into smaller areas.

2. You need to be careful if you are transfering a database from one series to the other.  As I understand it, you cannot transfer data between a series 7200 copy and a series 7300 copy.  You can transfer between 7300 and 7400 series but you need to make sure that when you transfer back to the 7300 series from the 73400 you uncheck all the selections for IMX and other extraneous types of data that the 7300 series cannot process.

It's a good program, and thorough. ;-)

Thanks again for the help.
Vibe-Rater

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Reply with quote  #9 
Good work Danny.

Considering your extensive experience with CSI I would be absulutely happy to get a curent update on cpmparison likes and dislikes. Does it have "X" function yet.  I'm told it has... rgds
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Reply with quote  #10 
In my day Oracle was only option - read - nightmare. Now I believe other sql db's are possible inc ms access....? Is that easier?  i find it hard to go past the single dics CSI and up and running after 20 minutes.  Again in my day 10 yrs ago - it would take days to get machine Analyst going.  Want to hear from more recent experiences that now it is all better please.
Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #11 
Yeah, they have what they call the Diagnostics Cursor which requires a few more keystrokes but functions pretty much the same.  I'm not so sure that it picks up on all of the sets of harmonics and sidebands that CSI's x key does, though.

Installation was expensive and difficult but my comparison on that is to single user copies of RBMWare and this was a network version.  My network version of RBMWare was already installed when I bought another service company out.

I had my IT guys do it and it was a challenge for them but they took a couple of initial missteps that really cost us. Once I got them talking to TSG, it got worked out fairly quickly but it is something that probably needs a professionals touch.

As far as the software functions, there are some things it does better than RBMWare and some things not as well. Being a true database, it is more flexible in reporting. Using the filtering features will eventually allow us to weed out all the good data and focus only on the things that really need our attention.  I don't think I will ever get it to the place that we can use this methods for gearboxes, compressors... but for motors, fans and pumps, it will save us lots of time once we get everything worked out.

We have rebuilt about half of our databases and just did one with multiple large conveyor drives and pulleys-all with speed linked to either the motor speed or the gearbox input speed (fluid couplings).  We haven't run those routes yet, but the setup they did looked good to me and I don't expect any real difference. We've got one coming up soon that is a bunch of intricate, variable speed drive trains. If we can get that one set up right, we will be able to handle anything else that comes down the road.

We still are not fully convinced of SKF's claim that Demod is superior to PeakVue in that it is more repeatable but it is probably at least as good.  We found wear in two kiln trunion bearings that turn at 16 rpm last month.  They are back at that site today and we will see if it is still there. That could still turn out to be true, but like I told the talented individual from SKF who made the claim, I'll believe it when I experience it and that will take some time.  It's no disrespect to him or SKF but CSI can put on a convincing Powerpoint presentation, too. Those of us in practice tend to be skeptical of such claims until we actually see proof and the only place to get that is in the field.

Their data collectors are not flashy or pretty but lightweight, durable, fully functional and they make a model that is stripped down (although not much) and much cheaper than the full blown version.  I've got both and an pleased with them. There's a learning curve involved in using the advanced analysis techniques but for data collection, it was easy.

That's all I've got time for now.  Maybe more later.


Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #12 
Back to the original subject-after some testing, we were able to export everything successfully.

We trimmed the size down by not copying any data (don't need it for what I'm going to do) or bearing databases and the 38 GB database became a much more manageable 15 MB.

I haven't imported all of it into our system yet, but having already tested the system, I'm confident that will be easy too.

Thanks for the help.
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Reply with quote  #13 
What really makes your comments so interesting is that you have such extensive experience with CSI and that makes comparisons to SKF particularly useful.  In the past I have fallen for sales speak and came away very disappointed. Why I am still CSI.  On top of that here in Australia the person who started all this back in late 80's was one of those with gift of gab English man.  He really infiltrated the market very well. This was in the days where SKF had only just bought palomar.  As a result CSI dominates here and is really the only way to go in pulp and paper.  Many mining sites and power inndustry as well. Think global speed set which the likes of commtest still can't do and the guy who is selling the french falcon here did not even know what a mpm -> rpm ratio was.  What also makes a difference is that when committed to a brand it is normally REALLY expensive to swap and the time new databases are created is stuff that can't be  charged for.  So if working for a company that is so much easier because salaries are still paid and pain is absorbed elsewhere.  I am just a sole operator and pay my maintenance fees annually which gives me acces to the CSI software. and the instruments are top notch and really reliable.  Hopefully the 2140's I will pick up before the end of this month will last me a few years to come.
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