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OLi

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Reply with quote  #1 
This may be the last gig for a (long?) while but it is our favorite CBI3000 crusher with a rotor weight of some 10ths of T. We balance it on a regular basis (as also previously described) once in a while but now it may be different.
I have discussed this before since I only seen it once or twice but that was a smaller crusher.
For some reason, maybe it is the only possible, the rotor is squeezed to the shaft with like 20+ bolted bars that make a friction fit to the shaft. If they get a less friction or even get loose it will be a problem at least if you try to balance it, done that...... Anyway, the data really looks strange and when listening it sounds like nothing I heard of from a mounted bearing before. I can't really describe it. I can likely upload some data tomorrow if it is as bad as the customer think. We still hope including him that he got corona in his ear.... It is like USD 20 000:- repair to pull the rotor as you swap bearing as you open and new friction fittings etc.... So are you used to hear noise like somebody wanted to get out from bearings?

I just got a field report, a lot of multiples of 1xRPM as expected so it is likely loose, to bad.
I have no sound report as my son is wiser than me and did not get that close to the monster.
So the only customers left are Tissue plants I guess, they run full production.

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MachDiag

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Reply with quote  #2 

Is this a machine made by Continental Biomass Industries, a company founded by Anders Ragnarsson and now owned by Terex?    

Pretty neat machines really.  They make a typical forestry mulcher look like a residential lawnmower.    It can be somewhat satisfying when you done balancing one, sort of  like taming a wild horse.  Have you heard the term "Horse Whisperer"? 

From your description, don't discount the possibility your machine might have a cracked, or broken rotor shaft.  I've come across one machine that was abused since birth, where it's operators fed it demolition materials it was not designed to eat.  The abuse had eventually broken the rotor shaft, which I believe is held in place by use of a Ringfeder device.  

I believe it was the infamous Dan Timberlake (yes, "Doctor Dan") along myself (whom at the time was probably of little assistance), balanced the very first CBI machine manufactured in the early 90's.

>>> 

OLi

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Reply with quote  #3 
Yes, Indeed it is very much such a machine. We have balanced them a long time as long as they crawled over here but I can't say when the first was but I maybe can look it up and yes it was really a impressive thing to face first time. Is it not "Machine whisperer" the term for the people that make these behave? It is in this case also a beaten thing. Once burnt down, rebuilt for electrical.... I described before how they broke the safety pins with a Volvo B18 engine block and just had one pile of waste left for the day so pins were not replaced so they finished the run and there was another same motor block hidden in the pile of waste, then the shaft was bent for 5+ years so balancing was a bit limited but now it is replaced since a couple of years so it has been possible to get pretty acceptable for such a beast. Now the multiples are dominating driveside and it is a hump one per rev in the TWF. I hope to upload a couple of plots in the weekend to enjoy :-). I think it was like that on the other one with the same problem that was a smaller one. I tried to balance that in that condition and that was not so fun. It got reasonable in the good end but the loose end.........
Some of them have a funny indicator of something that is a CTC accel and a converter, never really had time to figure out what they do, detect grinding metal? I saw it on the clip now, maybe they need one operational on the one we work on too.

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Good Vibrations since early 1950's, first patented vibrometer 1956 in the US.
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