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OLi

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Reply with quote  #31 
Indeed, not a vendor, only friends    https://assalub.com/en/produkt/grease-meter/


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RHW2ND

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Reply with quote  #32 
I used to represent SPM back in the 1970's 
Installed quick connect fittings on Holland American Cruise ships, much to the displeasure  of the Chief Engineer while in port Norfolk.

I came to the conclusion that carrying the shock pulse meter and all my other equipment that it was excessive and did well with spectrum analysis. Other than a dog and pony show. But seriously shock pulse meters are great if only type of tester you have it just takes a learning curve to determine severity of bearing problem.
OLi

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Reply with quote  #33 
Well even SPM have in some part turned from the dark side to the spectrum side ;-) but only so far as they need a double sensor for both the shockpulse and vibration, not really technically required in my world but as you say household animals play a part in many shows. In many parts of shipping in Asia, SPM is a synonym to vibration so sales people are good and succeed more than expected in some places.
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MarkL

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Reply with quote  #34 
Barry they(SKF) now have a metered electric grease gun I think, and also still do the meter for the hand pumped variety.
I do a few sites where I bring grease guns on the route and lube mainly motors on condition from the analyzer whilst taking the route data.

Semi-vendor alert



https://www.skf.com/group/products/lubrication-solutions/manual-lubrication-tools/grease-meter/index.html
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #35 
Everybody makes battery powered grease guns now: Dewalt, Milwaukee, Alemite to name a few. I have 2 of the Alemite guns (one for motors, one for fan bearings). They meter in 1/10ths of an ounce, and are simple to set and reset. I have added an extra point for each bearing I lube that has a 10 kHz Fmax and stores acceleration. I also added a keypad input point for each bearing and I log the amount of grease added. Seeing really positive results so far.
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MarkL

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Reply with quote  #36 
That's an interesting one, Rusty, I normally go by gE(envelope) and grease with the meter on live acc twf then retest after about a minute.
But that's food for thought the manual input point for grease dosage.
I monitor auto luber levels, in the same manner, we trend the fill level and then flag if we get two surveys with no movement.
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #37 
MarkL, do you log the levels in the autolubes? How do you know that it hasn’t changed? I’m going to start that on a few pumps tomorrow, using “tough” post-it notes to mark and date the levels. Nice thing about logging the lube is my meter then shows the last date and amount added, as well as a trend plot of the last 24 data points.
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Noknroll

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Reply with quote  #38 
quote from Rusty
Quote:
do you log the levels in the autolubes? How do you know that it hasn’t changed


I use to do this when I was an in house guy. On the clear and opaque canisters i would mark a line at the current level with the date and compare and re-mark at the next scheduled route.
as for the metal and other non see through cannisters?......good luck

just last week I checked a clients auto lube canister 3 weeks after the installed date and it was completely empty, the next scheduled replacement date was for January 2021 ?????

There are some excellent auto lube systems out there but many are not to be trusted
MarkL

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Reply with quote  #39 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyCas
MarkL, do you log the levels in the autolubes.? How do you know that it hasn’t changed? I’m going to start that on a few pumps tomorrow, using “tough” post-it notes to mark and date the levels. Nice thing about logging the lube is my meter then shows the last date and amount added, as well as a trend plot of the last 24 data points.


Rusty, the Skf ones we sell are clear along the side with a scale which goes from 125ml(full) to zero. I have a manual input point on the machine to which I enter the value on the side of the auto lube. 

tomcd3

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Reply with quote  #40 

Brg fully loaded and 1/3 hsg base (or bottom of shaft) is the typical SKF recommendation for split brg hsgs; which can be modified based on the application details (grease and or the brg used and the fan speed).

If using a grease with too high a viscosity, this full grease load may be problematic as posited.

On the subject of ultrasound:
If brgs are properly lubed (esp. continuously with an automatic system) then one doesn’t need ultrasonic detection because ultrasonic only detects when a brg isn’t lubed well vs when it is. 

Unfortunately automatic lubricators do tend to eliminate manual labor jobs (both lubricator and ultrasonic technicians). Regardless, it is time USA industries modernized and embraced proper lubrication technology for maximum reliability.

On the subject of domestically designed motors:
They tend to be designed without proper grease expulsion paths to allow the safe use of automatic lubricators; ie grease goes into windings instead of out grease chute. Again it is high time all larger motors in the US - that require relubrication - are supplied with grease valves.

SKF grease valve Capture.jpg


Email me if you'd like to discuss this further (tom.l.mcdermott@skf.com) by phone.


tomcd3

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Reply with quote  #41 
Double shielded brgs should NOT be relubricated.

They are designed to keep stuff (including grease) out and keep (factory supplied) grease in.

Hence shielded and sealed brgs are grease for life.

If you want to relubricate, buy open bearings.
RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #42 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomcd3
Double shielded brgs should NOT be relubricated.

They are designed to keep stuff (including grease) out and keep (factory supplied) grease in.

Hence shielded and sealed brgs are grease for life.

If you want to relubricate, buy open bearings.


We used to tell the motor shop to take all seals and shields off the motors that had grease thru (from the back and out the front) lube passages, and put pressure relief valves on all. Most of the Reliance (now Baldor) motors have the rectangular outlet that provides plenty of room for the old and excess grease to escape. Been a long time since I've seen a big motor with grease in the windings. Lots of little ones used to be, don't know if that's still the case or not.

D

Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #43 
Dave,

Are you aware of any definitive indication (vibration or otherwise) that there is grease in the windings?
RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #44 
No Danny I'm not. PDMA used to say they could detect it with one of their readings, but I saw too many false readings to give it any credence.
The motor shop that I worked for on the side when I was with Rockwell, and then did service for them when I started my own was where all my data comes from.
I've seen a lot of big and little motors torn down. Some with a little grease in the stator and some with a lot.

We have a dairy processor close to us, and I used to see small motors from them in the shop all the time. All had a ton of grease in the windings, and most were shorted. I saw a guy picking a repair up one day from there so I asked him how often they greased them. He said they used to have trouble with losing one "once in a while" due to bearing failure, so their maintenance man put on the operator check list to supply one pump of grease to the motor every day. So with 3 shifts, those little 2 and 3 hp motors were getting 3 pumps. Dang man.

We used to recondition and rewind the motors for one of my customers where we had instituted a quarterly greasing based on bearing size (and was close to run hours recommended by bearing manufacturer). They too had been losing avg. of three 500 to 800 HP motors per year on bearing failure. We started the greasing program and just this past fall lost the first one due to no grease in 13 years. Turns out the guy penciled in the PM, and it wasn't the only one he whipped with a pencil, so they fired him.
But when those motors came in for rebuild, there was very little grease in the windings. Typical amount was 1 to 2 Oz. per quarter, or about 44 to 80 pumps of a lever grease gun. There was always some grease in the windings, but very little for the amount of grease that was being put in them on a regular basis.

D
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