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SolidStateDisk

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Hello people, my name is Grek and I am from Greece.


I’m very happy to see an active forum about vibration analysis. Let me introduce myself first.


I study mechanical engineering, after conscript I had the opportunity for a very good internship at an oil extraction and desulphurisation plant (Kavala Oil. Greece). I had already work once again there for two months in the machinery shop, mainly doing maintenance work onshore and offshore, was pretty exciting experience.


When I start my internship I had the opportunity to join the Inspection team. I had no previous experience and almost no knowledge about this topic but I wanted to learn something new so I accept. Anyway, we did Vibration Analysis and shock pulse monitoring. We used Enpac data collector (not exactly sure which one) with Emonitor software and SPM T2000. But the work there was a bit “easy” mainly bearing problems, lack of grease or misalignment.  Furthemore I learn about NDT’ s and my last year project was about offshore platform inspection (ACFM, Eddy Currents etc).


After my internship I apply at a chemical/fertilizer plant (PFI Kavala, Greece). I had a pretty quick response, I prepared for the interview and everything went find. I got the vibration analysis position. But the environment there was like the hell of rotary machines. A big variety of machines, lot of dust, sometimes lack of maintenance and almost every possible problem. 


We use Adash A4300- VA3 Pro and Adash Digital Diagnostics System (they also had Enpac 1200 but accidently fell into a pulley. RIP). My daily routine is about 10 machines, there are almost 190 machines in total.


We are two people in the office. My colleague helps me a lot with my work, he has almost 10 years of experience but he mainly focus on NDT’s. We both try our best.


I like what I do, I hope to learn as many things I can from your experience  and knowledge and share my experiences. There are also some things that I hope to find an answer hre.

 

 
Sinski

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Reply with quote  #2 
Welcome to the board. There are many experience people on here with a wealth of knowledge. Have a look over the board there may already may be topics that will have any answers to questions you may have.
MarkL

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Reply with quote  #3 
Welcome to the Board,
Firstly great to have another member Join, I imagine how bad things can be in the fertilizer plant, as a former Farmer I know that stuff destroys anything ferro-metallic based, about the hardest thing on farm machinery, I can imagine the same goes for the plant that makes it, Loads of corrosion?

As Sinski said, there are plenty here with Varied experience in many industries, at the end of the day rotating machines all do the same, but the applications can offer varying challenges.


SolidStateDisk

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Not really. Corrosion is a problem but not the biggest one. The main units that produce the final product tent to have a lot of dust. The dust stack inside the impeller, shaft or go inside gearbox and become like a piece of rock. I have measure vibration peak up to 100 mm/s.
IMG_20190502_110814.jpg  IMG_20190506_110100.jpg 

Shurafa2

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Reply with quote  #5 
Welcome to the forum and to the community.

I assume you should have faster development. Many people in this speciality develop very slowly because they do not have the interest.

Also, because your plant has many machinery problems, you can have a faster exposure. It looks you need to be trained on balancing.

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa
106Bones

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Reply with quote  #6 
Welcome!  The cumulative man-years on this forum can be a significant asset to developing experience. Because, my opinion, of the Alpha Analyst types on the forum we spend a great deal of time polishing minute negligible differences to a bright shine. However, for developing craft talent there are few equals to the experience factor on his forum and their enthusiasm for sharing it.   

106Bones
OLi

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Reply with quote  #7 
Indeed.
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Good Vibrations since early 1950's, first patented vibrometer 1956 in the US.
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David Eason

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Reply with quote  #8 
Welcome SSD,
Your photos look like they could have come from the lime kiln area of a papermill. You have a big laboratory right outside your door; the others are right, you'll have many opportunities for learning.

David
fburgos

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Reply with quote  #9 
welcome to our crazy family
electricpete

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Reply with quote  #10 
Welcome!

What is the bag tied around the motor terminal boxes for.... an attempt to prevent dust entry into the motor at that point? 
yul

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Welcome!!
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #12 
SSD, be sure and read the Help & Tips post.  The "Latest Topics" button in the top ribbon menu is usually the first thing I click to see what is new.  Just message or email me if you have any questions.
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SolidStateDisk

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thank you all for your responses

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Eason
Welcome SSD,
Your photos look like they could have come from the lime kiln area of a papermill.

David


There is a unit that crash limestone but it's pretty good there. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by electricpete
Welcome!

What is the bag tied around the motor terminal boxes for.... an attempt to prevent dust entry into the motor at that point? 


I think so, not sure. The dust is pretty fine, is like walking on the moon surface.



Walt Strong

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Reply with quote  #14 
"The dust is pretty fine, is like walking on the moon surface."

If you have walked on the moon, then that experience is very impressive!

Walt
Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #15 
I did a little work in an ammonium sulfate fertilizer plant and as I recall, it was not so much the dust but the hygroscopic nature of the dust that made it such a problem by drawing moisture from the air.

I definitely remember that it would help you find any little nick in your skin with a sharp sting.
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