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Batman

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Hello,

Do you recommend oil analysis for a turbo expander using bearings with ceramic balls and phenolic cages? This is my first experience with this type of equipment. Does the analysis capture particles from these parts to trend and get some indication of developing failure?
Thank you.
OLi

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Yikes, if you get magnetic particles in those it is bad! Particle count would be the only one I guess unless they make see thru particles? I once complained on turbos on 3 sister ships that between them busted one turbo per year and they had no circ, no cooling, no filter and report always said "water damage". So I was stupid enough to suggest the innovation of circ cooling and filter as they had water for the intercooler. Old chief on shore said, "those greenhorns on board should sweat as much as I had to once"....... so predictive maintenance may wait a generation............. So anyway, water content if applicable?


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Curran919

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLi
"those greenhorns on board should sweat as much as I had to once".......


Oof, that is the sign of a terrible manager who only got there through assertiveness.
OLi

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Yes I seen a few of those over the years.
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Batman

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Hello Oli,

So if I understood correctly, oil analysis could be employed for:

  • particle count
  • water content

Thank you.
spciesla

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Reply with quote  #6 
Oil analysis is used to monitor and assess the condition of the bearings.  Additionally, it is used to monitor and assess the condition of the lubricant.  As far as the ceramic bearings go, I would have to do some research to see if wear would show up in the spectrochemical analysis.  It may be helpful to speak with your oil lab to see what their experience is with these types of the bearings.  Nevertheless, consider performing oil analysis to measure the oil condition.  In addition to the particle count and water content (Karl Fischer) mentioned previous, consider typical parameters such as viscosity, viscosity index, TAN (total acid number), spectrochemical analysis, and FTIR (soot, sulphation, and nitration).  Again, it may be good to talk to you lab and see what they recommend.
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