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RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #1 
Do any of you have "hang tags" that you fill out and leave attached to a machine when you find a problem in the field that you intend to write up?  I know there are maintenance tags that many plants use (some of mine do), but I am thinking of something specific to predictive maintenance.

Most all my customers have poorly labeled machines, if they're labeled at all.  On one occasion the wrong pump was replaced because the pump was actually mislabeled (large, permanent label, right at the pump).  On another occasion the wrong fan motor was replaced even though it was clearly labeled and matched the report.

So I'd like to have a PdM hang tag made up to leave "at the scene" to avoid mixups.  Also I find a lot of things that are not part of my "route" just by observation, like cracked welds, resonant sensing lines, hangers in need of adjustment, etc.  No matter how well I describe the location (even with pics), they usually can't find the problem when I write it up.

So I want a 3-part tag (with carbons): main part is hung at the problem, one copy to the responsible on-site person, one part goes with me.  Tags would be serialized so we're all on the same page.  I don't want to use existing maintenance tags because they are too often just ignored.  I want my own so I can track them, and so people know they are "different" and when they see them and look at them they know I'm getting it taken care of.

Do any of you use something like this or have experience with it?  Do you have a source for tags like this? Do you have samples you could share a photo of?  Do you think this will work?



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MachDiag

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Reply with quote  #2 
Being more of an infrequent outside vendor, I haven't gone quite that far.   I do use removable stickers that have my contact information and a QR code linked to my website.   I place them on machinery after performing corrective maintenance.  I'm mostly quite proud of my work and would sign my name to it afterwards.  I write the date and results of the work on it and try and place it where it will be seen by other plant personal, other vendors and my competition.  Hmm, I'm just thinking... it's kinda like a male dog marking it's grounds.   
Shoveldr

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Reply with quote  #3 
I've done that with ultrasonic leak surveys, tag the leak with a brightly colored tag so they can find it easier.  No carbons, we just recorded the issue on a spreadsheet and on the tag.

I've run into similar issues where the wrong asset was repaired.

I had one customer where the plant was brand new and the maintenance engineer got tired of waiting for operations to name and label the equipment (their job somehow), so he did it himself, then operations got around to it.  So for the most part the names in the CMMS did not match any of the labels on the equipment.  Not a fun place to work.

The only issue I would see with this is that I normally do data collection, then offsite analysis and reporting.  I do some quick analysis on site, but other than immediate issues, most of my reporting is done after the fact.  In this case it would require a trip back to tag the equipment.

ULine does offer custom tags, not to expensive, but you need to order a lot.  https://www.uline.com/CustomProduct/CustomStaticTagMultiPart.htm
Walt Strong

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Reply with quote  #4 
Here is my short response:
Considered -- Tried -- Abandoned

I am not trying to discourage anyone, so please "just do it" and report back with only good results!

Walt
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks guys.  Ted, I use a label maker to make labels in the field when I do alignments or balancing with the date and my contact info. The Brother laminated labels (with strong adhesive) stay in place really well (I use alcohol to clean the surface) -- I have some that have been in place for 10+ years out in the weather and sun.  As far as "marking my territory", I was aligning a ball mill pinion gear / gearbox / motor and I replaced all the shims with new shiny ones (all the same, all Precision Brand).  Guy asked me why I did that and I told him when/if they ever called me back I'd know if someone had been "sleeping in my bed" (no one else would ever have them placed and aligned like I do, and never seen anyone else use PB shims).

I'm not worried about tagging every exception in my report, just the obscure ones, and the things that are hard to find.  One of my motivations is that often I write something up and nothing gets done about it.  Operator walks by and hears a bearing for instance and will write it up, or tell a supervisor about it, and they have no idea I already know about it, or that I'm watching it closely.  I sometimes get asked by managers about things that I've written up multiple times over many months.  Tags would stop some of that.

Walt, change is hard when you get old, isn't it?

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Walt Strong

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Reply with quote  #6 
"change is hard when you get old, isn't it?"


I am always open to change. The hard part is to get the plant folks to change! I like your method of peeing on your customer's machines to mark them.


Walt              
RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #7 
Guy asked me why I did that and I told him when/if they ever called me back I'd know if someone had been "sleeping in my bed" (no one else would ever have them placed and aligned like I do, and never seen anyone else use PB shims).


Good thing I'm not down there Rusty, I use PB too, and I might just put them back the way they came out. Then you'd never know [biggrin]  Not sure the order of them would be the same, but perhaps.

D
Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #8 
I used to use tag with a tear off ticket on u-s leak routes, both numbered.  It worked in some places but in most the tickets just hung there right next to the unrepaired leaks. Year after year.

At one site, they kept paying me to tie tags on for three years. On the fourth year, I asked them why they were doing it and it was really just to give me work.  I thanked them but declined a fourth survey.

Another site wouldn't let you leave ANYTHING on the manufacturing floor.

Other than that, I would be concerned about stepping on peoples toes. It's hard to look the other way but you have to be careful pointing out deficiencies beyond your scope.

If you are looking for something like a permanent tag for your routes and using a UPC code, I found that Infosource makes a virtually indestructible printable tag.

They may have diversified into other tags since I contacted them about 10 years ago.
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
you have to be careful pointing out deficiencies beyond your scope


I would certainly agree with that statement, Danny.  How do you define the "scope" of what you do?  

Personally, I limit it to equipment that I monitor and report on, plus any problem on the attached structure (broken welds, cracked support members, loose bolting, etc).  I would not 'tag' safety or operational problems.  When they say (and they ALL do) that "Safety is everyone's responsibility!" what they really mean is "we set the rules, and you follow them, without pointing out deficiencies in our procedures or policies."  If I see something really egregious I will mention it to someone, but informally.  Operations items are none of my business, unless something they are doing is clearly wrecking the equipment, in which case I make a very 'soft' recommendation in the survey report, just to make them aware.  Some plants my reports are seen by one or two people, and others it's dozens.  A lot of things I don't even put in the report because it's so obvious and something should have been done about it already;  I will instead send an email directly to the supervisor involved, worded as "Hey I noticed such-and-such.  You might want to take a look at that pretty quick."


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Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #10 
"How do you define the "scope" of what you do?"

It's spelled out in my quotes that are accepted by my clients.

After that, it's better defined by feeling out the specific desires of each client. Some want to know everything you see and some don't want to know anything but stuff about the equipment assigned to you.

I usually deliver extra-route news in person because I'm only going to be really concerned if it's immediately detrimental to safety, production or the environment or if it's in an area where it's not likely to be seen by in-house people.

If I were maintenance management in some places, I would be sorely tempted to have someone (other than me) tie tags on everything that's broken. Then I would make the obvious case to upper management that my department is severely understaffed.
RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #11 
"Then I would make the obvious case to upper management that my department is severely understaffed."

Or that I'm not much of a manager and the men usually do what they want.

D
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