Sign up Calendar Latest Topics Donate
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Shurafa2

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 170
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello everyone,

I just wonder how common do you see the term "Ski-Ramp" being used. I'm not really sure if it's an exact [Edit: synonym  not symptom] of ski-slope or not.

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa
Walt Strong

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 889
Reply with quote  #2 
I like/use Ski Slope; it is down hill all the way! A ramp implies going up; just a thought and probably neither rare official!

Walt
John from PA

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 963
Reply with quote  #3 
I have never seen ski ramp used in the context of your question.  I have seen ski-slope or ski slope on hundreds of occasions.

Do an experiment with Google; the results are interesting.  But follow some Google tricks to refine the results.

vibration ski slope...returns all the hits where the words [vibration & ski & slope] appears in any order.  The result could include hits with vibration of a gearbox used on a ski lift and of course a lot more.

vibration ski-slope...returns all the hits where the words [vibration & ski-slope] appears in any order.  As an example, an avalanche can cause vibration felt on the slope of a ski resort and again, a lot more.

vibration "ski slope"...the quote marks around "ski slope" tell Google to look for the exact wording of ski slope.  The slope of the hill at the ski resort would not be a hit; however in the sentence "...the ski slope has a 10° angle would be a hit because ski and slope are in the exact order of the search term.

vibration "ski slope" -ramp...tells Google to return hits with the word vibration, exactly the phrase ski slope and exclude the word ramp (note the minus sign in front of ramp).

vibration "ski-slope" -ramp...tells Google to return hits with vibration, exactly the word ski-slope and exclude the word ramp (note the minus sign in front of ramp).

The last two search terms yield a vast number of hits, vibration related and with the mention of a ski slope type of spectrum characteristic. 

Leaving ramp in the search criteria accompanied by the word vibration yields few if any hits in the context of your question.





Shurafa2

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 170
Reply with quote  #4 
To give a clearer context to my question, this term (ski ramp) is stated as a part of the expected knowledge for certified vibration analysts. I'm not finding enough references to support/justify the use of this term in a regulatory process like certifying individuals. I've to say that I have no background on the reasons to use this term and not to use the commonly used one (ski slope).

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa 
John from PA

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 963
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shurafa2
To give a clearer context to my question, this term (ski ramp) is stated as a part of the expected knowledge for certified vibration analysts. I'm not finding enough references to support/justify the use of this term in a regulatory process like certifying individuals. I've to say that I have no background on the reasons to use this term and not to use the commonly used one (ski slope).

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa 


Can you provide a link to a source that uses ski ramp in the context of expected knowledge?  I've been involved in this field for 55 years, and I don;t think I've ever seen ski-ramp; ski-slope "yes".
Shurafa2

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 170
Reply with quote  #6 
Believe it or not, John, I expected that someone will ask the exact question you have asked. I'm completely with you but I thought I would rather ask about this term to be sure.

With respect to the actual document stating this term, it is ISO 18436-2 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines — Requirements for qualification and assessment of personnel — Part 2: Vibration condition monitoring and diagnostics). This document is copyrighted as you know but there is a very similar document in the public domain that copies the exact section of the standard. (In fact, I'm not really sure how come they copied this amount of the original document and made their document open for everybody!).

This is the link for the document. Page 13 shows the term.

https://www.bindt.org/downloads/CMGEND.pdf
The term Ski Ramp.jpg 

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa


electricpete

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 647
Reply with quote  #7 
I'd say it's pretty clear they meant ski-slope from the context.  If there were some other obscure  phenomenon named ski-ramp that is different than ski slope and that none of us ever heard of, it wouldn't be a basic test question.
Danny Harvey

Sr. Member / Moderator / Supporter
Registered:
Posts: 1,403
Reply with quote  #8 
I would suspect that the term ski-ramp is simply an occasion where translation failed to give us the exact term we were expecting.
Big Al

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 102
Reply with quote  #9 
I have been a member of BINDT for the last 10 years or so, and have been part of their Vibration Analysis Working Group (VAWG) for the last couple of years.

I am unfamiliar with this term and can only assume that it is another way of expressing ski-slope.

If you like, I can query this wording with the group. Unfortunately all VAWG meetings have been cancelled for the foreseeable future due to Coronavirus, but I should get some luck via email.
John from PA

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 963
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Al
I have been a member of BINDT for the last 10 years or so, and have been part of their Vibration Analysis Working Group (VAWG) for the last couple of years.

I am unfamiliar with this term and can only assume that it is another way of expressing ski-slope.

If you like, I can query this wording with the group. Unfortunately all VAWG meetings have been cancelled for the foreseeable future due to Coronavirus, but I should get some luck via email.


Personally I think you should do this.  Using various search methods I went back to about 2000, and did not find the use of the word “ski ramp” in any context related to machinery vibration.  If it is a typo, then it needs to be corrected; if it is intended, it needs to be explained.

It would be interesting where the term originated.  Shurafa seems to indicate it is in an ISO document.  In my experience with ANSI Committees (30+ years ago), each member committee, representing an individual country, feeds to ISO so maybe the BINDT document ”fed” to the ISO document. 


Big Al

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 102
Reply with quote  #11 
I'll forward this thread to the group chair and see how it goes.
fburgos

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 670
Reply with quote  #12 
I think It's a translator thing, seen it many times in my workplace, the guy making the translation don't have the technical knowledge/word and they use a "context" translation.. I mean ramp and slope we can translate it to Spanish as "bajada" "subida" "pendiente" but we don't have a word to express "sky slope", well to be honest I've never read a complete vibration books in Spanish.
Big Al

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 102
Reply with quote  #13 
Apologies for the late reply.

The response from BINDT is that the term comes from ISO 18436-2 originally. BINDT implements ISO 18436-2 and is therefore allowed to use this standard as a model for its scheme including the use of text.

Ski-ramp does indeed appear to be the same as ski-slope.

This wording could be considered at the next systematic review, but it's unlikely that the standard would be re-issued just to change one word. All of the users of the standard would be unhappy to have to pay extra just to see one word changed.
John from PA

Sr. Member
Registered:
Posts: 963
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Al
Apologies for the late reply.

The response from BINDT is that the term comes from ISO 18436-2 originally. BINDT implements ISO 18436-2 and is therefore allowed to use this standard as a model for its scheme including the use of text.

Ski-ramp does indeed appear to be the same as ski-slope.

This wording could be considered at the next systematic review, but it's unlikely that the standard would be re-issued just to change one word. All of the users of the standard would be unhappy to have to pay extra just to see one word changed.


Thanks for the effort Al.

Since ISO 18436-2 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 108, likely Subcommittee SC 5 I suspect it would be difficult to get changed.  It has been years since I was on a TC108 Committee, but there were about 20 different nations as I recall. 
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.