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Jim Crowe

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Reply with quote  #1 
Has anyone had any luck monitoring motor, flywheel. and driveshaft bearings on stamping presses? I am building a database for a company and they want to monitor these bearings. I am hoping Peakvue will filter out the high amplitude energy from the press and let me see rolling element bearing faults.
Danny Harvey

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Reply with quote  #2 
Jim,

I haven't worked on presses but I have used peakvue to filter 10 ips at 818 cpm on vibrating fluid bed dryer drive bearings.

Your guess is probably better than mine as to what filter settings are proper.  If you have the opportunity, I would do some trials before building the database.  If not, you might build several setups into the database and see what works best or if the guy collecting the data knows how, grab some analysis data with different settings.

Good Luck


Walt Strong

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Reply with quote  #3 
Jim,

Consider selecting bearing measurements in direction perpendicular to stamping direction. Another consideration might be to take machine condition (vibration) data while machine is operating, but not stamping to minimize the background impacts. If necessary, setup 2-machines; one for normal operation and one for unloaded operation.

Walt
Noknroll

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Reply with quote  #4 
Walt's method of measuring while not stamping is how I have done jaw crushers in the past for underground mining.
Vibe-Rater

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quite a few years ago I monitored Minster presses which stamped the tops of drink cans from flat strips of aluminium (note not aluminum) Amazing how that works. In my case I had to deal with non compliment bearings (cylindrical rolling element bearings without a cage. Rollers so close together they could not go astray). So during normal operation there was no relative motion between inner and outer race.  So we had to have the clutch disengaged to make sure relative movement.  regularly detected outer race damage which was in the form of heavy brinelling - lines of where the rolling elements hammered their way into the raceways. This was before the time of Peakvue so for me that is not even required. never saw a catastrophic failure but the vibration levels were at times scary. then you change a bearing and it does not look so bad.
Jim Crowe

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks for the replies.

Danny,
I do the same thing on spiral feeders, around 10 ips velocity. They don't have high impacting though. Peakvue takes out the high amplitude shaking and bearing defects show up good. I am afraid of the difference being the stress waves created by the metal to metal contacting with the stamping process. I will have to see how high that amplitude is.

Walt,
They already had sensors mounted and I am not sure of the orientation. I already set up points to take data while stamping and idle (not stamping). The only problem is some presses have a clutch on the main driveshaft so it doesn't turn while idle, only the motor and flywheel turns.

Vibe-Rater,
I am sure there will be some very high amplitude vibration on these presses. I will have to watch the trends for changes and the patterns seen in the spectral and waveform data. I would suspect there will be a change in one of these if a bearing starts going bad.

I will be back in there in a couple of weeks and see what kind of data I get and let you know.
RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #7 

Several years ago I did stampi in an auto parts place. The most relevant data I found was actually taken on the bed of the press in g’s. These were pressed with the drive at top via eccentric crank. Was kinda scary up there while the thing was operating (and oily/dirtier than all get out). Biggest problem we had was slide wear/looseness. Was easy to see on bed.
OLi

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Reply with quote  #8 
If a leg is cracked, vibration and likely function reduce and that was the case on the only one I have measured on a automatic heat exchange plate production line. Aux and drive machinery were pretty ordinary things like motors and such. 
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