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RustyCas

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Have been contacted by a local poultry processor about some potential work. Apparently they had a "consultant" who was doing periodic vibration monitoring of their ammonia piping. I've not met with them yet, so have no details. I don't know if this was "in addition" to, or "instead of" monitoring the compressors.

I've never heard of this and just wondered if this is legitimate or if he just sold them on the idea. Is this a real "thing" or just a money grab on his part?

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John from PA

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It might be more common than you think.  I have seen piping vibration studies being done in refineries and a few chemical plants.  Usually the company I worked for didn't get involved unless it was related to a rotating machine problem.

For the basics, review http://www.petroskills.com/landing-pages/ronfrend/part1.  Note along the top, just above the title, you can click through the four parts of the article including part 4 where some limits (from API 618) are discussed.  API 618 is the reciprocating compressor specification; as you can imagine piping vibration is a key maintenance item.  You may also want to review http://www.betamachinery.com/services/piping-vibration-and-integrity-assessment for the European viewpoint and also http://turbolab.tamu.edu/proc/turboproc/T19/T19119-134.pdf for a discussion of some techniques.  Also, when you deal with your potential customer, see if you can review a copy of API 618 which they likely have.
ukvibes

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Reply with quote  #3 
We occasionally do some CM of pipework vibration - on highly critical stuff. Usually only once every 6 or 12 months though. I have seen customers get in a pipework specialist to do a vibration survey on ammonia plant pipework and valves.

The Energy Institute in the UK publish a pipework vibration guidelines paper which we use for reference. It's the standard here for pipework vibration which the oil & gas industry use.

Heres a useful graph - https://tolengasteknik.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/ei.png?w=414&h=257

  

JuddJones

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Motion amplification camera could be a huge time saver and probably more thorough as well.
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #5 
Good point, J. I am dying to get an MA system, but can't justify it yet. Perhaps if this works out, and I can secure other similar clients, I could afford MA.
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JB1

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Reply with quote  #6 
Chart is on page -150 of this PDF............

http://www.gaselectricpartnership.com/2016_GEP_Tutorial_CentrifPipingDynamics_bySwRI_small.pdf
Ron Stiemsma

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Using MA at our Nuke Plant.  Big help for anything structural.
Curran919

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Reply with quote  #8 
Can confirm... worked a lot of pipe vibration problems on reciprocating compressors in my formative years. We also did the computational work on these units much of the time. Most commonly, this included pipe stress (thermal) and pulsation analysis (bottle design). We also often performed piping modal analysis and even used the pulsation study data to make a forced response analysis of the pipe work. Designing piping supports on reciprocating compressors can be a nightmare when you've got a design temperature range of 300+ degrees C.

In fact, we seldom worked directly with the compressors themselves. Our CM was almost entirely structural: foundation, piping, bottles, etc.

In many cases, MA would have been great for the piping vibe, especially for the pipe racks. However, in the compressor houses (at least in the natural gas production compressors), most of the piping was underfoot. This would have made it very unfeasible to remove all the grating and use the MA camera. easier to remove bits at a time, or use a long stinger to look for vibration high-spots through the grating.
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