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Curran919

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I have a client talking about "body noise sensors". This gives nothing on google. I think this may be a direct translation from a different language. I can't see how this can relate to structure-borne noise. Maybe he is talking about Acoustic Emission sensors? Anyone familiar with this term?
John from PA

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Could they be referring to a noise dosimeter?  These are devices typically worn by personnel to assess noise exposure over a long period of time in the workplace.  This is used to establish the time weighted average (TWA) over eight hours.

OSHA on this side of the pond has a write up at https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2010/09/01/The-Use-of-Noise-Dosimeters-in-the-Workplace.aspx.


Curran919

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That indeed sounds like it would be a close fit, but this is definitely a machine diagnostic tool.
John from PA

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curran919
...but this is definitely a machine diagnostic tool.


Maybe https://www.augury.com/ and an extension of the technology.
Curran919

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John from PA


Maybe https://www.augury.com/ and an extension of the technology.


I don't immediately see the connection.

By machine diagnostics, I simply meant a sensor for machines, not people.
Curran919

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I searched through an old project and found what he was referring to:

I'm a little disappointed. I thought I was going to be introduced to a new kind of sensor! B&K 4374 is just a normal accel with 86kHz resonance. This is on a testrig for journal bearing stress testing by the by.

1.1         Body Noise

The structure borne noise of the test rig casing is measured by a B&K 4374 accelerometer (SN 1691481), see Figure 3.6. As the structure borne noise is dominated by high frequencies, the sampling frequency for this signal will be 25.6 kHz leading to a measurement bandwidth of 10 kHz.


John from PA

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curran919


I don't immediately see the connection.

By machine diagnostics, I simply meant a sensor for machines, not people.


They (Augury) looks like their technology includes machinery; see https://www.augury.com/industries/facilities/
Walt Strong

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My body makes a lot of noises, but I doubt anyone  on this board would be interested in measuring it![crazy]

I guess is this example "body" refers to the machine component case. "Structure borne sound" terminology has been around for 50-years that I can remember, and it is measured with a contact sensor on casing (typically an accelerometer). Bruel & Kjaer from Denmark often used this terminology. I usually associate structure borne sound with broadband mid to high frequency vibrations and ultrasound. I have seen this term applied to aircraft, submarines, pumps and compressors and other machine types.

John, did Augury actually refer to structure borne sound?

Walt
John from PA

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt Strong
John, did Augury actually refer to structure borne sound?

Walt


I don't have first hand knowledge of their technology, just found it trying to help Curran919.  But it appears it is some form of a device that goes between the sensor (of many type) and their propriety software. 

auguscope.jpg 

Walt Strong

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The Auguscope appears to be a wide frequency band DAQ capable of accelerometers and ultrasound sensors (perhaps 40-kHz and below). I used to conduct walk-around machine surveys with both vibration analyzer (CSI 2120) and ultrasound meter (SDT 150) because of the supplemental data for bearings, gears, couplings, belts, leaks, and electrical that UT provides. It was very awkward, but it provided excellent machine condition data!

Walt
MarkL

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Augury are just combining an ultrasound and vib sensor in one and using the US to measure bearing stress and the acc to measure low-frequency stuff, the daq feeds back data to an app on a connected Android or iPhone which relies on a connection to the cloud where a machine learning algorithm tries to suss out the issue and feedback the details on the app.
They are doing the whole system as a service thing, you are tied to them continuously.
Curran919

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkL
Augury are just combining an ultrasound and vib sensor in one and using the US to measure bearing stress and the acc to measure low-frequency stuff, the daq feeds back data to an app on a connected Android or iPhone which relies on a connection to the cloud where a machine learning algorithm tries to suss out the issue and feedback the details on the app.
They are doing the whole system as a service thing, you are tied to them continuously.


Exactly, just like the 50 other companies that are doing identical services nowadays. Unfortunately, the vast majority of it is marketed much better than it was designed, and they do not have the vibration expertise or appropriate diagnostics behind the scenes. If seen behind the scenes of quite a few of these companies, and it is disturbing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt
I usually associate structure borne sound with broadband mid to high frequency vibrations and ultrasound. I have seen this term applied to aircraft, submarines, pumps and compressors and other machine types.


It always seemed like an archaic term to me, but trying to ascertain a fixed definition a few weeks ago, there was very little information on what frequency content it would refer to, but overall, sonic (20-20k) was agreed. I don't understand how it differs from vibration, other than being vibration on a highly transmissible object that is likely to lead to high airborne noise.

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