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Shurafa2

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Reply with quote  #1 
What Makes a Vibration Training Fulfilling?

Many times, debates and different options are heard when the subject of quality of training is discussed by vibration practitioners. Human nature imposes biases and sometimes our evaluation is not based on the same basis or equal exposure. Some of us had a real chance to see different training first hand and those have better views than others (including me).

In your opinion, what are they elements that you find fulfilling and instrumental in considering a certain training to be better than others?

I'm listing below a few possible features and your are welcome to agree, diagree, add or comment.

1- Clarity. This could be in the use of expressive ways to explain the concepts in the textbook. Being concise and consistent are important. Clear printing is a part of the clarity. Being consistent in the format of the parts of the manual is essential. Some training manuals are slides which are meant to help the instructor during the course but the slides are not self explanatory.

2- Use of enough examples. Best examples are from real world cases. And they should be carefully selected to explain the topics being discussed. Some training manuals explain examples within the text of explaining the concept which is not what most readers prefer. It is easier to follow the examples if they are separate with indications to what is given and what is asked for.

3- Illustrations. This is very crucial as the vibration feild is very data intensive. Photos of real objects are good but sometimes simplified sketches are easier to understand. Additional notes on the illustration itself or on the caption help a big time. Tables, flowcharts, plots help in explaining and in summarizing the topics being discussed.

4- Additional aids on the textbook. Readers like to see lists of key terms/a glossary, related references for additional reading or standards, index for pages, guide for exam taking tips, summary of equations etc

5- Good instructor. Excellent vibration analyst does not necessarily make a good vibration course /workshop instructor. They are two different sets of skills. A good instructor is expected to read and analysis faces in the class and verify understanding. He/she needs to recognize and and anticipate misunderstandings/ missed knowledge from the attendees to correct this or bridge that.

6- Methods of instruction. Lecturing specially if the slides are readily available doesn't work for practicing analysts specially for who left academia years ago. Giving the attendees a chance to practice the materials usually results in the risk of not finishing the materials or going over them too fast.


How do I evaluate these class, do I include the food and breaks? Maybe.

In fact, I find excellent elements in almost every training manual of the famous vibration training providers. I have to say however I attended very few. Most of my impression is based on the manuals I saw.

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa
OLi

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Reply with quote  #2 
Indeed and I think you covered it well but it is not always easy to get there. I remember a shift team from a rolling steel mill only waiting for the dinner and dancing and then one guy from saw mill industry that was extremely interested in the same session, not easy. A mix of people balancing turbine parts all day that can balance anything but can't add 2+2 w/o a calculator and turbine engineers that can calculate anything in the head but are not good at practical balancing, in the same session, interesting.
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Shurafa2

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Reply with quote  #3 
OLi,

The class makeup is tricky and could fail the training. If the training is conducted in house or specially prepared for one facility, there is a much greater chance you will see this issue on non homogenous participants.

Because the registration is not done "carefully" in such cases, there will be vacationers and dragons in the class. As you said there would people of all levels of background and interest.

If you deal with satisfaction surveys for training, you would see outlayer feedbacks which cannot be explained. Some attendees evaluate nicely if they are entertained and poorly if they are not.

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa
JuddJones

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Reply with quote  #4 
People can definitely disrupt the training. In my level 2 with TA we had 2 very young engineers from an oil refinery that were asking ridiculous questions that were more about bragging about their equipment and experiences than attaining knowledge. The instructor finally intervened on day 2 told them to see him after class if they had questions.

  I find the computer animations that Mobius uses make all the difference for me in training. They make it much easier to understand complex vibe issues rather than interpreting someones drawings. I also like the "boots on the ground approach". Understanding the complex math first (Vibe institute) IMO is not near as valuable as being able to visualize the physical movement of the machine. I am not very math minded however, so I realize my bias.
OLi

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Reply with quote  #5 
To see the glimps of understanding in a fellow human is the most rewarding a teacher can experience it is payback for the struggle.
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Vibe-Rater

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OLi
To see the glimps of understanding in a fellow human is the most rewarding a teacher can experience it is payback for the struggle.


I ditto you OLi. I do fully agree that to see a persons eyes light up after explaining makes my heart melt. There are not many of us in this world of vibration and after 26+ years do count myself as among the "old lot". Hopefully you and others don't mind.
OLi

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Reply with quote  #7 
Everybody are welcome and you never stop learning, there are so many aspects. I never thought I would find a geared coupling behaving like a cardan shaft but there it was last week 850 Kg's of it.
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RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #8 
And then you have the “old dog” taking a course after many years of field experience, who questions much of the “common knowledge” or injects “that’s not how it works in the real world.” What do you do with a student like that?
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trapper

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyCas
And then you have the “old dog” taking a course after many years of field experience, who questions much of the “common knowledge” or injects “that’s not how it works in the real world.” What do you do with a student like that?


That is what I was going to add to what makes training fulfilling. Having other, experienced people in the class that would share information that complements what the instructor is teaching. Often, the instructor teaches the technical or "book" knowledge and often doesn't have the experience or time to cover real-life experiences.

Curious how sometimes the simplest components have the most perplexing symptoms.

ETA: Forgot to answer your question, Rusty ... listen to them!
Barry

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Reply with quote  #10 
Rusty it was my experience in a TAC class they would have been more than welcome and in a CSI class you may be asked to help someone that was having trouble understanding the material.
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OLi

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Reply with quote  #11 
Discussion is the best part. If that cant be provoked to happen I feel failed..... Just like here :-) ? 
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Ron Stiemsma

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Reply with quote  #12 
Depends on the class.  I am a visual learner so examples are always good.  When I began, ages ago, The basic theory was good and as many case histories as I could get my hands on.  As I progressed, now I look for those little tidbits of information that make me slap my forehead and say "why didn't I think of that".  That is one reason that I read these forums.
RRS_Dave

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Reply with quote  #13 
If the doctor tells you you only have 8 hours to live, go to training.
It'll be the longest 8 hours of your life. [wink]

D
Shurafa2

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RRS_Dave
If the doctor tells you you only have 8 hours to live, go to training.
It'll be the longest 8 hours of your life. [wink]

D


I guess I'll use your reply as "words of wisdom".

Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa
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