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OLi

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Reply with quote  #1 

My customers don't read the report, not even the summary.
Customer explicit question is "will it run 6 months so we can organize refurb?"
Recent gbx that is screaming and we find a tiny embryo of damage in 1 bearing and we write
explicit like "this will last longer than a year" it is on a low speed shaft. We also have a gbx inspection report from a GBX OEM but not The OEM that find nice wear on gears etc.
So our short resume is, "refurb the gbx and yes it will run 6 more months unless something unexpected occur", you know people turn off lube oil and so on.
So the status is as expected after 20+ years of contentious operation for a mixer gbx. with reasonable light load.
Bearings are worn and likely got excess clearance from that it move gearmesh etc. etc but there are no obvious instant destruction brg fail to be seen. Worn bearings may turn over and self destruct at any time as any bearing.
What is the first question? Yes you guessed correct "what bearing do we need to change?"
My short answer would be, "all of them", if you open up to swap one it is a fair chance that some of the others may fall apart due to wear. I have seen bearings totally spreading the balls all over the place when just opening a cover as the wear made the clearance so large so there are nothing retaining them but that was more 25-30 years and now 10 years later that machine is shut down but it did good work for all those years.

 

 


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Shoveldr

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Reply with quote  #2 

When I was working for the service group of an equipment OEM we got a call from the account manager after our first service report was delivered to the customer.  He was freaking out that we condemned all their motors.  

The summary sheet showed "Action required in 30 days", that action to lubricate their motors, but the customer was apparently unable to move past the second page of the report and called screaming about having to replace all their motors.

I've also heard anecdotes of services guys putting 10 blank pages in the middle of a report to see if the customer was actually reading it or no.

OLi

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Reply with quote  #3 
So we should paint pictures with happy and sad machines and when you click on the sad ones you will see a one line text why or just a pictogram describing the problem? Maybe will not help either.
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fburgos

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Reply with quote  #4 
because words are too confusing, how about this.

[biggrin][smile][frown][mad]

it should be included in next version of iso, from now on we dont call it "zone A" it's called very happy face
HuskerTim

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Reply with quote  #5 
Maybe some variation in this pain scale will get the message across...or is this the face we make when getting the questions about the report that didn't get read...[wink]
rmt264q.gif 

Shoveldr

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Reply with quote  #6 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fburgos
because words are too confusing, how about this.

[biggrin][smile][frown][mad]

it should be included in next version of iso, from now on we dont call it "zone A" it's called very happy face


I was doing some mentoring with a customer that had a really well written alignment specification.  The analyst I was working with was confused by the misalignment he was seeing because he had helped align this pump and they had smiley faces across the board.

I had him show me the report and I pointed out that the numbers sucked.  "But we have smiley faces"

Looked at all the recent alignments, none met their published standards, "but we have smiley faces", said the manager.

I calmly asked if they had purchased the optional printer to print gold stars for their foreheads after the alignment.

They finally got their sales guy to look at their alignment system, he discovered that someone had changed the specs, which was why all of their alignments jobs were coming out as excellent.

fburgos

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Reply with quote  #7 
Alignment and happy faces... Some German big name started this trend
Shurafa2

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Reply with quote  #8 
I do not read all reports I receive. Should I?

I read what I think is important for me to know or to take action. Some organizations have communication diarrhea and it's really overwhelming for people whose jobs are primarily on the floor.

Sometimes I get lazy, so do many people in our industry and then I miss important actions. Any document of 5 pages or more needs to have a summary, in my opinion, to help readers. Otherwise, chances are high that key messages may simply get lost with the details.

Unfortunately, "following up" has become an unwritten part of the roles and responsibilities of many technical professionals if they want to make sure their effort is not wasted. I found that good relationships and building trust with the report recipients help a lot in giving the right attention to the recommendations.

Some of my long reports that I wrote over the years were designed for an imaginary technical person that will need them in the future. Some contain educational sections to avoid researching the vendor manuals and repeat what I did, should a similar problem take place again. When I send these reports to non-technical people, I write in the email, "please go to Section 7 for the required actions from you". They usually do not read other sections. Some may look at the pictures that I usually include in these reports.


Regards- Ali M. Al-Shurafa
OLi

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Reply with quote  #9 
Yes, read the summary and I will be happy!
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fburgos

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Reply with quote  #10 
I send a sumary every friday, 20 people in the mail, if im lucky I get feedback from same 2 people.

daily I send detailed report only for machines on alarms with problems that need corrections, some have same advice as last month report
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #11 
I learned long ago that if an explanation - including the required action - is longer than a single paragraph, they won't read it.  If the report (or summary) is longer than a page-and-a-half, they won't read it.  Luckily, when I worked for my friend Don Rainey he came up with a one-problem-per-page report format, that has a box for the explanation that was just long enough, and there were 2 boxes for graphs.  That's all you got, and I discovered it was enough -- if I can't prove my point with that, then it's likely that no immediate action is needed.

For my largest customer, I create a summary report that consists of a copy-and-paste of the explanation from the detail pages, and though I'm looking at nearly 200 pieces of equipment, it's never more that 1-1/2 pages long.  I include the detail pages but I'm sure no one ever looks at them (got to CYA).  And they don't want a dashboard page that summarizes the condition of all their equipment - if they don't need to DO something, they don't want to see it.  We live in a "visual" world now and I think people just get tired of having to look at so much stuff, so when reporting, less is more.

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trapper

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Reply with quote  #12 
At my old employer, I used to write up several pages in reports detailing what I found and the possible causes and why I decided on the recommended course of action. This was in the early 90's and people weren't used to see vibration analysis and I felt I needed to give them reasons why I chose the course of action to follow.

When I got to my latest employer, they had an online system to create reports and the format didn't fit to provide long-winded explanations. I had to force myself to come up with succinct descriptions of the problem and the remedy. You can only fit 4 pictures on the report (one being an overall picture of the machine by default) without spilling over to more pages. I've learned to provide "just the facts" information along with only a couple pictures. Sometimes I have to include an annotated picture of a point not in alarm because it details the problem much clearer than one that includes a lot more 'squiggly' lines but is actually in alarm; e.g., a vertical versus a horizontal spectrum.

I get a lot less grief keeping it brief.
RustyCas

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Reply with quote  #13 
“I get a lot less grief keeping it brief.”

Yep. Definitely stealing that.

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